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November 10, 2009

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Pedro Santos

Nice blog!!!
Keep up the good work...
Thanks

Mike Stewart

You got a really useful blog.
I have been here reading for about an hour.
I am a newbie and your success is very much an inspiration for me.
Thanks,
Mike Stewart

Ben Severson

Really nice blog...
Keep up the good work!!!

Miguel

I think just being soberly discrete and comfortable usually does the job…

men tuxedos

This is so true! More often than not, we can't notice that our looks also matter when it comes to presenting, not only the things that we are saying. Thanks for this information.

JOBS_frend

You write well will be waiting for your new publications.

Internet Download Manager rapidshare

Fantastic, I was actually brought here to your article from a buddy of mine. She suggested it since we were having a conversation about this issue the other day.

Kathy Reiffenstein

Lisa,

I'd love to read your post, but the link is broken. Can you re-post it?

Thanks,
Kathy

Lisa Braithwaite

Great article, Kathy! I lean toward Adam's opinion on this issue, in terms of being memorable and branding myself, but I don't think you're saying anything in the article that precludes being creative!

I expanded a little on personal clothing discomfort in a recent blog post, after watching Wanda Sykes "sucking it in" on her talk show: http://tinyurl.com/ycjtkkn.

Kathy Reiffenstein

Touche, Adam! I like your suggestion and I love your style!!

Kathy

Adam Lawrence

Kathy: "However, I think there might be instances where your audience would be uncomfortable with a very "unique" costume...perhaps in the situation where the audience was ultra conservative or it was a very formal occasion. In this instance, the unique attire might create the wrong kind of memorability!!"

I think there is always some way to be unique without offending sensibilities. For a super formal audience - what about top hat and tails? Or formal Chinese wear... Whatever fits the message!

Kathy Reiffenstein

Hi Adam,

You make a good point about being unique and using your clothes to help make you memorable.

I would just add, though, that first and foremost, you should think about what will be comfortable and acceptable for your audience. In some situations, and especially if you're Steve Jobs, you can dress in a unique fashion and it very naturally and acceptably adds to your branding.

However, I think there might be instances where your audience would be uncomfortable with a very "unique" costume...perhaps in the situation where the audience was ultra conservative or it was a very formal occasion. In this instance, the unique attire might create the wrong kind of memorability!!

Thanks for stopping by, Adam.

Kathy

Kathy Reiffenstein

Hi Lee,

What great advice...on both counts! I hadn't thought about the badge, but you're absolutely right.

Thanks for contributing.

Kathy

Lee Potts

I'd like to add to number 5 and/or 8 that you should remove your conference badge before taking the stage. Depending on how the lights are set up, the reflection could either distract or temporarily blind. Also, it might not be a bad idea to pack an extra outfit just in case you run into a problem: http://www.breakingmurphyslaw.com/2008/07/17/the-worlds-worst-wet-t-shirt-contest/

Adam Lawrence

Nice list... but a little conservative for my taste. If I deserve to be on stage, I deserve to be remembered - and clothes can help.

Whatever you wear, the golden rule is "be unique": you should not be dressed the same as any one else who appears on the stage with, before or after you. If they are all in suits and ties, go for a turtleneck, bright poloshirt or best of all something unusual that reinforces the theme of your talk.

An example: Steve Jobs is always talking about relaxed simplicity - so his jeans and turtleneck support his message, as well as emphasising his expressive face and hands. (Did you spot the rolled-up dark sleeves? That's an old mime trick.)

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